International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene

Home Hygiene & Health

The Leading Source of Scientific, Professional & Consumer Information

Inactivation of surrogate coronaviruses on hard surfaces by healthcare germicides

BACKGROUND: In the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak, finding viral nucleic acids on hospital surfaces suggested surfaces could play a role in spread in health care environments. Surface disinfection may interrupt transmission, but few data exist on the effectiveness of healthcare germicides against coronaviruses on surfaces. METHODS: The efficacy of healthcare germicides against 2 surrogate coronaviruses, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), was tested using the quantitative carrier method on stainless steel surfaces. Germicides were o-phenylphenol/p-tertiary amylphenol) (a phenolic), 70% ethanol, 1:100 sodiumhypochlorite, ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), instant hand sanitizer (62% ethanol), and hand sanitizing spray (71% ethanol). RESULTS: After 1-minute contact time, for TGEV, there was a log10 reduction factor of 3.2 for 70% ethanol, 2.0 for phenolic, 2.3 for OPA, 0.35 for 1:100 hypochlorite, 4.0 for 62% ethanol, and 3.5 for 71% ethanol. For MHV, log10 reduction factors were 3.9 for 70% ethanol, 1.3 for phenolic, 1.7 for OPA, 0.62 for 1:100 hypochlorite, 2.7 for 62% ethanol, and 2.0 for 71% ethanol. CONCLUSION: Only ethanol reduced infectivity of the 2 coronaviruses by .3-log10 after 1 minute. Germicides must be chosen carefully to ensure they are effective against viruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. American Journal of Infection Control. 2011;39:401-7.

Author: Hulkower RL, Casanova LM, Rutala WA, Weber DJ, Sobsey MD

Posted: 19/07/2011

Published: 01/01/2011

Publication Type: Journal article

Publisher: American Journal of Infection Control.